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BC bats not to blame for COVID-19; in fact, bats need OUR help.

Press Release:

BC bats not to blame for COVID-19; in fact, bats need OUR help.

BC Annual Bat Count contributes to surveillance for white-nose syndrome across the province

 

 

For Immediate Release

May 15 2020

 

Victoria, BC - Even though today is Endangered Species Day, the COVID-19 pandemic has shone a negative spotlight on bats, due to concerns over BC bats carrying the virus. This association is a myth - bats in BC do not have or spread the SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for COVID-19. Misinformation such as this can lead to unfounded fear and persecution of bats.

In reality, bats are an essential part of our ecology, consuming many insect pests each night. Bats in BC suffer from many threats, and almost half of our 15 species are ‘at-risk’. One of the more familiar species, the Little Brown Myotis, is now listed as Endangered in Canada as a resident bat in the Victoria area.

A simple way to support bats including the Little Brown Myotis is to participate in the BC Annual Bat Count this June. Habitat Acquisition Trust (HAT), the local land trust for the region is also the host of the Victoria chapter of the BC Community Bat Program, coordinating local research and volunteer efforts in the CRD. HAT is requesting colony reports and volunteer assistance for this citizen-science initiative that encourages residents to count bats at local roost sites.

Bat counts are easy, fun, and safe, not to mention vital for monitoring bat populations. “The counts are a wonderful way for people to get outside, respect social distancing guidelines, and be involved in collecting important scientific information” says biologist Mandy Kellner, coordinator of the BC Community Bat Program. Volunteers wait outside a known roost site, such as a bat-box, barn, or attic, and count bats as they fly out at twilight. Ideally, 2 counts are done between June 1 and 21 before pups are born, and  2 more between July 11 and August 5 when pups are flying.

In 2019, the Annual Bat Count collected baseline data on bat populations at 337 sites across the province, and hopes to monitor these sites and more for 2020. The count data helps bat biologists understand bat distribution and normal variation in colony sizes before our bats face impacts from a devastating bat disease called White-nose Syndrome.  

White-nose syndrome is an introduced fungal disease, fatal for bats but not for other animals or humans. Not yet identified in BC, the disease continues to spread in Washington State, less than 200 km from our border.  Results from the Bat Count may help prioritize areas in BC for research into treatment options and recovery actions.  

“We know relatively little about bats in BC, including basic information on population numbers” continues Paige Erickson-McGee, Stewardship Coordinator for Habitat Acquisition Trust. “This information is more valuable than ever, particularly if it is collected annually. If people want to get involved but don’t have a roost site on their property, we will try to match them with a roost site nearby.” The Annual Bat Counts offer a safe way to learn about bats and share knowledge, while contributing to bat conservation efforts.

Funded by the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, the Forest Enhancement Society of BC, and the Habitat Stewardship Program, and with support of the BC Conservation Foundation and the Province of BC, the BC Community Bat Program provides information for people dealing with bat issues on their property or who have questions about how to attract bats.

To find out more about bat counts or white-nose syndrome, to report a dead bat, or to get assistance dealing with bat issues in BC, visit www.bcbats.ca or call 1-855-9BC-BATS. If you are located in the CRD, you can also email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

More factual information about bats, the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and COVID-19 is available at:

CLICK TO VOLUNTEER FOR BAT COUNTING

Photos and credits:

Townsend’s Big-eared Bat is one of the species counted during the BC Annual Bat Count. Photo: Aimee Mitchell

Bat count 2019 before social distancing. Photo: Okanagan Bat Project.

Bat emerge form a roost site at dusk. Photo: Sunshine Coast Wildlife Project.

Map of bat count sites across BC. BC Community Bat Program.

WNSSpreadMap_8_30_2019: Current map of WNS in North America. www.whitenosesyndrome.org

 

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